Baltic Sea

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Today in the Baltic group of linguists attribute along with the "living" languages (Lithuanian, Latvian, etc.) and "dead" languages. By "dead" Baltic languages are galindsky (or golyadsky), Zemgale, Curonian, yatvyazhsky (or sudavsky, sudinsky) and seliyshy (or selonsky) languages and dialetky. Historical facts about the Baltic languages and dialects, as existing today and extinct, it is attributed to their variety and large number. In the early century, the 2 nd millennium BC was observed multilingualism in the Baltic Sea. Prior to that time there was the formation of the Baltic language type, but quite accurate historical the facts of the matter is not known to scientists. One of the major events of this time was the formation of two areas: peripheral and central, resulting in the selection of a group of early pre-Slavic language formation of two different groups prabaltiyskogo language. In the future there is a reduction of the use of the Baltic languages in the southern, southeastern and eastern parts of the Baltic states. This was due to migration of the Slavs to these areas.

In the early century, the 2 nd millennium witnessed important developments in the Baltic Sea. Thus, the disappearance of dialects in the Baltic region located in the basins of the Oka, Dnieper and Volga, and in Belarus linguistic borders relegated to the northwest and west, and the Prussian language departs to the east on one side and the north of the other. The small Baltic languages, which today are dead, this time undergoing significant damage, and over the 14-17 centuries, come to its present condition.