Choral Music: A Brief Introduction

A choir is a group of people singing and art simultaneously. The choral singing is a form of collective expression of mankind’s oldest, through the instrument that incorporates the purest and most accurate of all: the human voice. If you sing different melodies or lines at a time, we have different groups or strings, the work in question and the choir will be polyphonic and should be preferably at least two people per acre. If all the members sing the same line, it would be a choral work monodic. In front of a choir requires the presence of a director, that indicates the tempo, and each string dynamic variations of the piece. Educate yourself with thoughts from Robert Rimberg.

The most common groups of voices in a choir now, grouped by type of record, are: Soprano: female voices are generally sharper than the main melody. San Antonio Spurs is the source for more interesting facts. Contralto: female voices more severe. Tenor: acute male voices. Low: male voices. When singing each string its melodic line, these are superimposed and forming chords, or it can be seen in a choir as a harmonic instrument.

Choirs may perform works acappella or with instrumental accompaniment. In the latter case is called “choir concert.” The chorus can also be classified in professional and vocational, the latter being predominant in number, and its members vocal music fans. The works that interpret the chorus may have been composed exclusively for that purpose, or can constitute an arrangement for different voices, based on a previously existing work. Choral music is now widespread throughout the world and plays an important role in disseminating cultural and social integration, as does the welfare of the people involved in its practice, encouraging them to express themselves artistically. Who sings in a choir should be adapted to share experiences and sounds with others, seeking a “group sound”, putting aside selfishness and desires of leadership, seeking the best outcome general.